A colourful display in the church building

During the most recent SIAMS inspection the school was graded as 'outstanding'.

The full report can be read below and a printable copy, together with some recommendations are attached.


Statutory Inspection of Anglican and Methodist Schools (SIAMS) Report

Carleton Endowed Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School

Carleton-in-Craven, Skipton, North Yorkshire, BD23 3DE

Current SIAMS inspection grade 

Outstanding

Diocese 

Leeds

Previous SIAMS inspection grade 

Good

Local authority 

North Yorkshire

Date of inspection 

4 May 2017

Date of last inspection 

13 June 2012

Type of school and unique reference number 

Aided 121624

Inspector’s name and number 

Lynne Gillions 662


 

School context 

The school is in a semi-rural setting serving the village and surrounding area. It has 154 pupils on roll, the majority of  whom are of white British heritage. The proportion of pupils receiving support for special educational needs or  health needs is below the national average as is those in receipt of the pupil premium. Staffing in school has been  relatively stable since the last inspection and areas for improvement identified at the last inspection have been  addressed.

The distinctiveness and effectiveness of Carleton Endowed Church of England Primary School as a  Church of England school are outstanding 

• The school is led by an enthusiastic and committed headteacher, ably supported by staff and governors,  whose Christian vision enables pupils to flourish and achieve standards above national averages. • Christian values are deeply embedded and acknowledged by all stakeholders as making a significant  contribution to the excellent behaviour, caring relationships and overall well-being of the children. • Children feel happy and safe in school and this creates a productive learning environment. • The strong support from the church, the creative teaching of religious education (RE) and pupil-led  collective worship offer children a range of opportunities to explore spirituality. 

• Pupils express themselves confidently and teachers encourage them to deepen their learning through  effective and focused questioning. 

• Pupils benefit from a range of activities which embed them into the local community. 

• The whole school community engages in social action by supporting a range of different charities, some of  which are suggested by the children.

Areas to improve 

• Clarify children’s understanding of different faiths and different expressions of Christianity so that they can  more competently discern similarities and differences. 

• In RE, identify next steps in their learning so that children are clear what they need to do to improve  further.


 

© The National Society (Church of England and Church in Wales) for the Promotion of Education 2016  

The school, through its distinctive Christian character, is outstanding 

at meeting the needs of all learners 

Christian values of friendship, endurance, peace, trust and thankfulness are explicit and deeply embedded in school.  All stakeholders recognise their impact on achievement, behaviour, relationships and the well-being of children.  Parents described them as ‘organic’ and say they influence their children’s lives outside of school too.  Standards in school are generally higher than national averages and, where necessary, measures are put in place to  support individuals and help remove barriers to learning and enable children to reach their full potential. Children  enjoy school and are good learners. 

The school offers children a range of experiences to help them engage with spirituality. As well as collective worship  and RE lessons, activities such as Wacky Worship days, supported by the church, provide creative ways for children  to explore spiritual themes. Children are encouraged to discuss openly spiritual issues by asking questions and  forming their own opinions. They demonstrate real confidence in expressing themselves and they listen well to the  views of others. Philosophy for Children also develops their capacity to grapple with complex ideas. The Christian  ethos of the school makes a significant impact on the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of the  children. 

Behaviour in school is excellent. Children are polite and friendly and they support each other in their learning.  Relationships between all stakeholders are strong and supportive. Staff work as a team and they provide good role  models. The children know they can always get help from them and the Worry Box enables children to express any  concerns and nominate their chosen member of staff to talk with them. Children are nurtured and cared for well.  This springs from the deeply embedded Christian values. Children are acknowledged and rewarded not just for  achievement but also for demonstrating those Christian values. Governors also have an award for children who  ‘don’t walk on by’ but demonstrate kindness or are good role models for others. 

As well as Christianity, children learn about other world faiths, benefitting from visits to different places of worship  and by having visitors into school to talk about their faiths and cultures. This is broadening their horizons. They also  meet children from different cultures when they join in activities with other schools and this is giving them an understanding of diversity. 

Participation in the Archbishop’s Archie B project has given children an understanding of the needs of their own and  other communities. It has involved them in actions such as creating a quiet prayer space in school, tidying up the  park and local church and raising funds for a number of charities including Donna’s Dream House which provides  holidays for families with a terminally ill child. Pupils have also engaged with Fairtrade activities and now organise a  weekly Fairtrade tuck shop. These ventures are engaging children in considering the needs of others and putting  Christian principles into action.

The impact of collective worship on the school community is outstanding 

Collective worship is a fundamentally important element of school life. It unites the school as they gather each  morning. ‘It sets the mood for the day.’ Children enjoy it and participate well. They enter and leave collective  worship singing which creates a joyful atmosphere. Pupils engage well during worship and they particularly enjoy the  weekly pupil-led worship.  

The pupils’ collective worship group is well established and competent at planning and delivering worship. There are  core members of the group who take a lead but all children are invited to their planning meetings so different  people are involved each week. They take responsibility for the whole of worship which usually includes a Bible  story, role play and prayers they have written themselves. All children use Makaton (signing) when saying the Lord’s  Prayer so that everyone can join in. The children also devise their own questions to ask their peers to help them  reflect on the story. They make links between Bible teaching and the school’s Christian values. All teaching staff lead worship along with visitors from other organisations such as the Zephaniah Trust and  Fairtrade. Worship is also led weekly by the vicar who shows great commitment to the school. She also works with  staff and children to plan and deliver special celebrations which are held in the church. Some of these are Eucharist  services and parents, staff and children may take communion or receive a blessing. Children can also participate in  monthly Family Praise services on a Sunday with the support of school staff and governors. These services along  with an understanding of the liturgical seasons and symbols are giving children an understanding of Anglican practice  but their awareness of other Christian denominations is more limited. 

Prayer is important and children understand that it is valued by believers. They have opportunities to write and read  their own prayers and to pray spontaneously during collective worship. There is now a quiet, indoor prayer space in  the play area where children can put prayers onto prayer leaves or read the books provided. The church organises a  Prayer Day where children visit different stations to focus their thoughts on different types of prayer.


 

© The National Society (Church of England and Church in Wales) for the Promotion of Education 2016 

Collective worship is very well organised by a dedicated co-ordinator. It is making a significant impact on the lives of  the children who can make links between Bible stories, Christian values and their own lives. ‘The story of Zacchaeus  shows that Jesus made peace with him and it shows that when we have done something wrong we can turn over a  new leaf and start again.’ Collective worship strongly contributes to the school’s Christian foundation. It is well monitored as evidenced in the Collective Worship Review Book and involves different stakeholders.

The effectiveness of the religious education is outstanding 

The school holds the gold award for the RE Quality Mark. This testifies to the importance of the subject and the  high quality of teaching and learning. It is taught creatively with an emphasis on practical activities and children enjoy  this approach. Art, craft, Godly play, construction are just some of the methods used to deliver RE.  Standards are in line and often above national expectations. Children are developing a wide range of skills as they  progress through school. They are empathetic and have enquiring minds. Children’s contributions in discussions are  valued and staff develop their thinking skills by excellent questioning techniques. This was demonstrated in an  outstanding lesson where Year1 and 2 children were discussing the story of the Lost Sheep. They readily made links  to their Christian value of endurance and drew conclusions such as, ‘God would never give up on us, he would  always come and find us’. In a Year 4 and 5 lesson, a Godly play approach and looking at the work of artists  stimulated children’s thinking about the creation story and the world in which they live and led to thoughtful  contributions. 

Children enjoy learning about other faiths and different Christian traditions. Visits to places of worship and visitors  such as those from the Interfaith Centre help to consolidate children’s learning. However, children need more  practice at clarifying their thoughts when making distinctions between different religions. 

Big books present a wealth of evidence illustrating the variety within the curriculum and tracking the responses of  children. There is capacity to give children a greater insight into their learning by identifying their next steps more  clearly. These books inform assessment and progress is tracked in school and monitored by governors. The subject leader is very enthusiastic and has made a significant impact in school supporting other staff and  developing an exciting, creative curriculum. She monitors the subject thoroughly using a range of methods and  meets with a foundation governor who reports back to the governing body. Consequently, children benefit from an  excellent grounding in the subject, make good progress and achieve high standards.

The effectiveness of the leadership and management of the school as a church school is outstanding The school is led by an enthusiastic headteacher who is committed to the Christian values of the school. He is  assisted by staff who work well together and by governors who are clear about their role and wholeheartedly  support the Christian foundation of the school. All leaders confidently articulate their shared vision and give the  school a clear sense of direction which is ultimately reflected in the education the pupils receive. They recognise  that the school’s distinctiveness and effectiveness are dependent on this shared vision. 

Leaders monitor and evaluate well, taking on board the views of all stakeholders. Priorities are identified and lead  into the School Development Plan. Leaders recognise the strengths of the school and know that staff ensure that  children are happy and flourish. 

Parents really appreciate the way in which their children are welcomed and embraced into the school community.  They have confidence in the leadership team and staff who are always approachable. They know that if they have any  problems, they will be dealt with sympathetically and professionally. They also approve of the school’s emphasis on  teaching the children emotional intelligence, recognising that the school is dedicated to educating the whole child  not simply focusing on academic attainment. The school communicates effectively with parents and seeks their views  in an annual questionnaire. 

The school also benefits from the partnership with the church. Clergy and church members support collective  worship, RE lessons, Wacky Worship and facilitate special events such as the Prayer Day. This makes a huge  contribution to the spiritual development of the children. The vicar also has a pastoral role in school when  necessary. Her work is valued by all stakeholders. 

Leaders have built networks with other schools so that they can share expertise and good practice. They have  ensured that Carleton’s collective worship and RE leader receives regular training and she is able to share her  expertise with staff and with other schools. Staff development is encouraged with a view to equipping future leaders. This school has addressed issues from the previous inspection and made significant strides forward.


 

SIAMS report May 2017 Carleton Endowed Church of England VA Primary School, Carleton, Skipton BD23 3DE

© The National Society (Church of England and Church in Wales) for the Promotion of Education 2016  

School context 

The school is in a semi-rural setting serving the village and surrounding area. It has 154 pupils on roll, the majority of  whom are of white British heritage. The proportion of pupils receiving support for special educational needs or  health needs is below the national average as is those in receipt of the pupil premium. Staffing in school has been  relatively stable since the last inspection and areas for improvement identified at the last inspection have been  addressed.

The distinctiveness and effectiveness of Carleton Endowed Church of England Primary School as a  Church of England school are outstanding 

• The school is led by an enthusiastic and committed headteacher, ably supported by staff and governors,  whose Christian vision enables pupils to flourish and achieve standards above national averages. • Christian values are deeply embedded and acknowledged by all stakeholders as making a significant  contribution to the excellent behaviour, caring relationships and overall well-being of the children. • Children feel happy and safe in school and this creates a productive learning environment. • The strong support from the church, the creative teaching of religious education (RE) and pupil-led  collective worship offer children a range of opportunities to explore spirituality. 

• Pupils express themselves confidently and teachers encourage them to deepen their learning through  effective and focused questioning. 

• Pupils benefit from a range of activities which embed them into the local community. 

• The whole school community engages in social action by supporting a range of different charities, some of  which are suggested by the children.

Areas to improve 

• Clarify children’s understanding of different faiths and different expressions of Christianity so that they can  more competently discern similarities and differences. 

• In RE, identify next steps in their learning so that children are clear what they need to do to improve  further.


 

© The National Society (Church of England and Church in Wales) for the Promotion of Education 2016  

The school, through its distinctive Christian character, is outstanding 

at meeting the needs of all learners 

Christian values of friendship, endurance, peace, trust and thankfulness are explicit and deeply embedded in school.  All stakeholders recognise their impact on achievement, behaviour, relationships and the well-being of children.  Parents described them as ‘organic’ and say they influence their children’s lives outside of school too.  Standards in school are generally higher than national averages and, where necessary, measures are put in place to  support individuals and help remove barriers to learning and enable children to reach their full potential. Children  enjoy school and are good learners. 

The school offers children a range of experiences to help them engage with spirituality. As well as collective worship  and RE lessons, activities such as Wacky Worship days, supported by the church, provide creative ways for children  to explore spiritual themes. Children are encouraged to discuss openly spiritual issues by asking questions and  forming their own opinions. They demonstrate real confidence in expressing themselves and they listen well to the  views of others. Philosophy for Children also develops their capacity to grapple with complex ideas. The Christian  ethos of the school makes a significant impact on the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of the  children. 

Behaviour in school is excellent. Children are polite and friendly and they support each other in their learning.  Relationships between all stakeholders are strong and supportive. Staff work as a team and they provide good role  models. The children know they can always get help from them and the Worry Box enables children to express any  concerns and nominate their chosen member of staff to talk with them. Children are nurtured and cared for well.  This springs from the deeply embedded Christian values. Children are acknowledged and rewarded not just for  achievement but also for demonstrating those Christian values. Governors also have an award for children who  ‘don’t walk on by’ but demonstrate kindness or are good role models for others. 

As well as Christianity, children learn about other world faiths, benefitting from visits to different places of worship  and by having visitors into school to talk about their faiths and cultures. This is broadening their horizons. They also  meet children from different cultures when they join in activities with other schools and this is giving them an understanding of diversity. 

Participation in the Archbishop’s Archie B project has given children an understanding of the needs of their own and  other communities. It has involved them in actions such as creating a quiet prayer space in school, tidying up the  park and local church and raising funds for a number of charities including Donna’s Dream House which provides  holidays for families with a terminally ill child. Pupils have also engaged with Fairtrade activities and now organise a  weekly Fairtrade tuck shop. These ventures are engaging children in considering the needs of others and putting  Christian principles into action.

The impact of collective worship on the school community is outstanding 

Collective worship is a fundamentally important element of school life. It unites the school as they gather each  morning. ‘It sets the mood for the day.’ Children enjoy it and participate well. They enter and leave collective  worship singing which creates a joyful atmosphere. Pupils engage well during worship and they particularly enjoy the  weekly pupil-led worship.  

The pupils’ collective worship group is well established and competent at planning and delivering worship. There are  core members of the group who take a lead but all children are invited to their planning meetings so different  people are involved each week. They take responsibility for the whole of worship which usually includes a Bible  story, role play and prayers they have written themselves. All children use Makaton (signing) when saying the Lord’s  Prayer so that everyone can join in. The children also devise their own questions to ask their peers to help them  reflect on the story. They make links between Bible teaching and the school’s Christian values. All teaching staff lead worship along with visitors from other organisations such as the Zephaniah Trust and  Fairtrade. Worship is also led weekly by the vicar who shows great commitment to the school. She also works with  staff and children to plan and deliver special celebrations which are held in the church. Some of these are Eucharist  services and parents, staff and children may take communion or receive a blessing. Children can also participate in  monthly Family Praise services on a Sunday with the support of school staff and governors. These services along  with an understanding of the liturgical seasons and symbols are giving children an understanding of Anglican practice  but their awareness of other Christian denominations is more limited. 

Prayer is important and children understand that it is valued by believers. They have opportunities to write and read  their own prayers and to pray spontaneously during collective worship. There is now a quiet, indoor prayer space in  the play area where children can put prayers onto prayer leaves or read the books provided. The church organises a  Prayer Day where children visit different stations to focus their thoughts on different types of prayer.


 

© The National Society (Church of England and Church in Wales) for the Promotion of Education 2016 

Collective worship is very well organised by a dedicated co-ordinator. It is making a significant impact on the lives of  the children who can make links between Bible stories, Christian values and their own lives. ‘The story of Zacchaeus  shows that Jesus made peace with him and it shows that when we have done something wrong we can turn over a  new leaf and start again.’ Collective worship strongly contributes to the school’s Christian foundation. It is well monitored as evidenced in the Collective Worship Review Book and involves different stakeholders.

The effectiveness of the religious education is outstanding 

The school holds the gold award for the RE Quality Mark. This testifies to the importance of the subject and the  high quality of teaching and learning. It is taught creatively with an emphasis on practical activities and children enjoy  this approach. Art, craft, Godly play, construction are just some of the methods used to deliver RE.  Standards are in line and often above national expectations. Children are developing a wide range of skills as they  progress through school. They are empathetic and have enquiring minds. Children’s contributions in discussions are  valued and staff develop their thinking skills by excellent questioning techniques. This was demonstrated in an  outstanding lesson where Year1 and 2 children were discussing the story of the Lost Sheep. They readily made links  to their Christian value of endurance and drew conclusions such as, ‘God would never give up on us, he would  always come and find us’. In a Year 4 and 5 lesson, a Godly play approach and looking at the work of artists  stimulated children’s thinking about the creation story and the world in which they live and led to thoughtful  contributions. 

Children enjoy learning about other faiths and different Christian traditions. Visits to places of worship and visitors  such as those from the Interfaith Centre help to consolidate children’s learning. However, children need more  practice at clarifying their thoughts when making distinctions between different religions. 

Big books present a wealth of evidence illustrating the variety within the curriculum and tracking the responses of  children. There is capacity to give children a greater insight into their learning by identifying their next steps more  clearly. These books inform assessment and progress is tracked in school and monitored by governors. The subject leader is very enthusiastic and has made a significant impact in school supporting other staff and  developing an exciting, creative curriculum. She monitors the subject thoroughly using a range of methods and  meets with a foundation governor who reports back to the governing body. Consequently, children benefit from an  excellent grounding in the subject, make good progress and achieve high standards.

The effectiveness of the leadership and management of the school as a church school is outstanding The school is led by an enthusiastic headteacher who is committed to the Christian values of the school. He is  assisted by staff who work well together and by governors who are clear about their role and wholeheartedly  support the Christian foundation of the school. All leaders confidently articulate their shared vision and give the  school a clear sense of direction which is ultimately reflected in the education the pupils receive. They recognise  that the school’s distinctiveness and effectiveness are dependent on this shared vision. 

Leaders monitor and evaluate well, taking on board the views of all stakeholders. Priorities are identified and lead  into the School Development Plan. Leaders recognise the strengths of the school and know that staff ensure that  children are happy and flourish. 

Parents really appreciate the way in which their children are welcomed and embraced into the school community.  They have confidence in the leadership team and staff who are always approachable. They know that if they have any  problems, they will be dealt with sympathetically and professionally. They also approve of the school’s emphasis on  teaching the children emotional intelligence, recognising that the school is dedicated to educating the whole child  not simply focusing on academic attainment. The school communicates effectively with parents and seeks their views  in an annual questionnaire. 

The school also benefits from the partnership with the church. Clergy and church members support collective  worship, RE lessons, Wacky Worship and facilitate special events such as the Prayer Day. This makes a huge  contribution to the spiritual development of the children. The vicar also has a pastoral role in school when  necessary. Her work is valued by all stakeholders. 

Leaders have built networks with other schools so that they can share expertise and good practice. They have  ensured that Carleton’s collective worship and RE leader receives regular training and she is able to share her  expertise with staff and with other schools. Staff development is encouraged with a view to equipping future leaders. This school has addressed issues from the previous inspection and made significant strides forward.


 

SIAMS report May 2017 Carleton Endowed Church of England VA Primary School, Carleton, Skipton BD23 3DE

© The National Society (Church of England and Church in Wales) for the Promotion of Education 2016